How much do companies monitor their BYOD users?

Most users who agree to BYOD policies do it reluctantly because of two main hang-ups: They are afraid of having personal devices wiped if they’re lost or stolen, and they don’t want IT to be able to monitor what they do on their phones. 

Where BYOD policies fail: It comes down to users

Most workers today want to be able to work from their own mobile devices at least some of the time, yet security will still present a major problem. So what’s keeping BYOD programs from being effective? In short, it’s the users themselves. 

Sample BYOD policy template

Bring your own device (BYOD) programs call for three critical components: a software application for managing the devices connecting to the network, a written policy outlining the responsibilities of both the employer and the users, and an agreement users must sign, acknowledging that they have read and understand the policy. 

While IT sweats BYOD policies, users reject them

Two recent reports show that neither users nor IT are particularly comfortable with BYOD as it stands today. And while IT is working to refine these policies, users are likely to ignore them. 

Lawsuit: Did company spy on former user’s iPhone?

When an employee links a personal account to a company iPhone, who is responsible for removing it when the user leaves the company? A court recently weighed in.

Court shifts BYOD responsibility: What it means for you

A California court has made a controversial ruling on BYOD programs that could leave companies struggling to cover a new, unforeseen cost. 

Users, IT clash on BYOD policies: 4 keys to fix it

There’s always been tension between users and IT when it comes to BYOD security. A new survey by Webroot shows where these two groups disagree and where they could find some common ground.

Mobile workers may not be who you think they are

If you picture a mobile worker, the first thing that may come to mind is the executive firing off emails from a smartphone at an airport or a salesperson closing a deal from his car (hopefully while pulled over to the side of the road). But at the recent Consumerization of IT in the Enterprise […]

10 keys for a BYOD policy that won’t get you sued

At first, BYOD was something a few brave companies were giving a shot. Then it became a nice way to get users off corporate devices. Now company phones are rare and BYOD is becoming the norm. What’s the next hurdle for Bring Your Own Device? Keeping it from becoming a legal liability. 

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Smartphone hack could bypass passcodes

The  lines between old-fashioned hacking attacks and the kinds of high-tech, complicated code-cracking you might see in a “Mission Impossible” movie are starting to blur. And it’s a good reminder of why users should be practicing some basic rules on protecting smartphones.