Somehow, BYOD is still stumping IT pros

Recent findings from Dell and Dimensional Research show that while IT has made serious headway with Bring Your Own Device (BYOD) plans, some basic functionality and security issues are keeping it from becoming a resource users are comfortable with. 

Malicious code sneaks through App Store’s defenses

Usually when you hear about malicious applications, it’s a case of hackers evading Google Play’s defenses. But it was recently discovered thousands of App Store apps have potential security flaws. 

10 keys for a BYOD policy that won’t get you sued

At first, BYOD was something a few brave companies were giving a shot. Then it became a nice way to get users off corporate devices. Now company phones are rare and BYOD is becoming the norm. What’s the next hurdle for Bring Your Own Device? Keeping it from becoming a legal liability. 

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Companies still aren’t ready for the risks of a mobile workforce

Believe it or not, it’s been almost ten years since the iPhone’s introduction. While that wasn’t the first smartphone by any means, it marked a serious change in the IT landscape: Suddenly, mobile devices were everywhere, and company data was on them. 

Gone, but not forgotten: Wiping Android devices doesn’t always work

One of the best tools for making sure a lost or stolen phone doesn’t become a data breach nightmare is to wipe its memory. It also helps make sure that devices you’re done with don’t contain sensitive information. 

The Top 10 tech stories of 2014

Before we look ahead to next year’s challenges and promising developments, let’s take a look back at 2014’s biggest headlines.

How much do companies monitor their BYOD users?

Most users who agree to BYOD policies do it reluctantly because of two main hang-ups: They are afraid of having personal devices wiped if they’re lost or stolen, and they don’t want IT to be able to monitor what they do on their phones. 

Where BYOD policies fail: It comes down to users

Most workers today want to be able to work from their own mobile devices at least some of the time, yet security will still present a major problem. So what’s keeping BYOD programs from being effective? In short, it’s the users themselves. 

While IT sweats BYOD policies, users reject them

Two recent reports show that neither users nor IT are particularly comfortable with BYOD as it stands today. And while IT is working to refine these policies, users are likely to ignore them. 

Lawsuit: Did company spy on former user’s iPhone?

When an employee links a personal account to a company iPhone, who is responsible for removing it when the user leaves the company? A court recently weighed in.